STUDY OF ADULT REVACCINATION AGAINST DIPHTHERIA AND TETANUS

  • Justė Mykolaitytė LSMU MA Medicinos fakultetas
  • Leonas Valius LSMU MA Šeimos medicinos klinika
Keywords: diphtheria, tetanus, boost immunity, revaccination, knowledge

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of adult patients of Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Kauno klinikos Family medicine clinic, who are familiar with the recommendation to boost immunity (revaccination) against tetanus and diphtheria every 10 years. The methodology of research. Data was collected using anonymous questionnaire. 105 patients of Family medicine clinic, who are over 25 years old participated in direct survey. A specially formulated questionnaire for this survey was used. The data analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel 2019 and statistical program package SPSS version 23.0. The disparity was considered statistically significant when p<0.05. Results. Survey showed that 33.3% (n=35) of patients of Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Kauno klinikos Family medicine clinic were familiar with the recommendation to boost immunity (revaccination) against tetanus and diphtheria every 10 years. University graduates 40.8% (n=20) were better informed than respondents with primary, secondary or vocational education 22,2 proc. (n=8), p=0,196. The majority of respondents 72.3% (n=76) evaluate vaccination positively (“very good” and “good”), but they don’t have more knowledge about the need for revaccination, p=0.086. Significantly more respondents under 45 were informed by family physician than 18.9% (n=7) than 8.1% (n=3) (46–59 years old) and 10.8% (n=4) (60 and older), p=0.026. None of respondents, who are 60 or older, were informed by surfing in the internet or by media whereas 16.4% (n=6) (46–59 years old) and 5.2% (n=2) under 45 years old mentioned these sources. There were significant difference between age groups and source of information, p=0.026. Significant correlation were found between getting vaccinated against tick–borne encephalitis and knowledge about revaccination against tetanus and diphtheria, p=0.004. Only 14.28% (n=15) participants were revaccinated and 81.9% (n=86) were not, the rest 3.82% (n=4) didn’t remember their immunizations status. Conclusions. There is not enough information spread about free revaccination for adults against tetanus and diphtheria every 10 years. Two thirds of patients of Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Kauno klinikos Family medicine clinic – 66.7% (n=70) were not informed that it is recommended to get revaccinated and even more people – 76.2% (n=80) were not informed that it is free. Reasons for revaccination were following “to take care of one’s health” – 53.3% (n=8), “it is useful” – 40% (n=6), One respondent emphasized that this “was recommended by family physician”– 6.7% (n=1). The role of family physician is important when making decision about vaccination. 9 patients of 14, who were informed about revaccination by family physician, got the immunity boost. It was greater impact to final decision than getting informed by family member or surfing in the internet.

Published
2021-06-18